Seeing a Chum Salmon Run

All photos taken by Carolyn Treadway.

Moving to Panorama from the Midwest, I had little idea of what a “salmon run” was, nor of the importance of salmon as a keystone species of the whole Pacific Northwest coast; nor that salmon is essential to the entire way of life of coastal Native Americans. But I kept hearing about salmon.  Intrigued, I wanted to learn much more. Thus I eagerly signed up for an outing to see a chum salmon run, sponsored by the Panorama Green Team.  Twenty residents conveniently rode a Panorama bus to Kennedy Creek, a nature area north of Olympia.  Our trip was expertly facilitated by fellow residents Warren Dawes and Cleve Pinnix, who serve as guides for the countless visitors to this particular salmon run each November.  They led us to observe and understand many amazing sights. How fortunate we were to have such an opportunity!

        Surprisingly, our mid-November outing was blessed with sunshine. The forest was lush and beautiful with giant evergreen trees, mosses, ferns, and tributary streams. Chum salmon abounded! They were returning to the very stream in which they had hatched, probably four years ago, to spawn and die. These amazing fish were born in this freshwater stream, then, after a time in the stream and estuary, had swum into the ocean, where they spent their entire adult lives, swimming as far as 18,000 miles to the Asian oceans and back to return home.  How do they find their way? (There is so much more to learn…)

The creek and streams were alive with salmon: females using their tails to dig holes in the stream’s gravel, males fighting each other for proximity to a female ready to lay a thousand eggs, so that their milt could fertilize those eggs. The streams were also littered with the bodies of salmon that had spawned and were dying or dead, thus completing their life cycle. The salmon provide food for all species that eat them, and their bodies provide nutrients to the forests into which they are carried by those species. Many tons of salmon carcasses are deposited to feed the plants, soils, and creatures of the forest each year.

It’s an amazing, incredible ecosystem, which has been kept in delicate balance by Nature for millennia. But now humans and wastes that we create are greatly impacting that entire ecosystem.  Our wise guides emphasized the importance of clean, fresh water for the salmon and their eggs and young fry, because polluted water makes reproduction even more fragile or kills the fish.  Pollution, habitat loss, and climate change have caused great decline in the numbers of surviving salmon in the Puget Sound and the Salish Sea.  As a result, the resident orca whales (whose food is salmon) are starving and their survival is at risk.  And so on and on.

Ah, yes. As Chief Seattle profoundly said over 150 years ago: “This we know, all things are connected.”  Recent Green Team programs have focused on connections between ourselves and our local environment. For example, local storm water runoff carries toxins directly into the Puget Sound, greatly affecting the health of fish and all species therein. Being present to the majesty of Kennedy Creek with chum salmon churning in its streams, we visitors could connect the dots. Our pollution affects the fresh, clean water these very fish need for their spawning. Let us help their return to their natal home by decreasing our pollution, so that these amazing salmon can birth the next generations.

A Resident’s Perspective – Amazing Grace in Christian Hymn Song

Panorama Corporation has no religious affiliations.The community of residents at Panorama is active in pursuing a variety of hobby & interest groups; the Corporation and Panorama staff enjoy helping to support these groups as needed.  Membership to any group on campus is voluntary.

Written by Panorama resident, Mary Jo Shaw. November 2017

“Christian Hymn Sing” is a resident-driven happening that meets at Panorama on the first Wednesday of each month in The Gallery at Seventeen51 Restaurant & Bistro to give praise to God in an informal way, not to perfect our singing skills, but just use what’s left in us to enjoy praising in song, visiting with new or old friends and enjoying a no-host breakfast together. No RSVP needed. All are invited from on or off campus.

In 2010, words of their pastor’s sermon preyed on two Panorama couples’ heartstrings, “…even if you’re old, you can still do something.” They “prayed,” worked, studied, used individual talents to begin what God nudged and named, “Christian Hymn Sing.”

Mary N. and Mary P. selected copyright-free hymns. Bill used his computer to copy them, and Les worked at his piano. Excited, loving hearts beat nervously long hours and days. The four aimed at making the event a monthly hour of inspiration for Panorama residents. Did they have too many ideas, or not enough? That first event had to be a success so the participants would return. The four weren’t afraid, just had hopeful concern that people would come whether they could sing or not. Maybe five or six would attend and help spread the word for the next months.

Chris and I had just moved to Panorama in July 2011. Our closed-circuit TV caught my attention, as well as notices on bulletin boards: No RSVP needed and ALL invited. Can’t sing? HUM ALONG…

I was one of 19 who showed up to the smaller dining room. A little basket held tiny papers with a short Bible verse for each to take home. We enjoyed visiting with old and new friends over a no-host breakfast, followed by hymn singing…with Les leading us at the upright piano.

Each month we greeted 20, 24, 25..then up to 30! Nov. 1, 2017, we welcomed 39!!! Maybe we’ll overflow into the main dining room. We are invited to share anything for a few minutes. Several have played an instrument, given a testimony, read a snippet, or ?? It’s over in 60 minutes!

Doug has led us now for a couple of years with his strong, beautiful voice and tidbits about the hymn itself, and wife, Patricia, collates and staples the song sheets. I enjoy “advertising” with posters, PCTV reminders, and with this blog. Together we make a “joyful noise to the Lord.”

The poem below that Betty C. brought in November tells the story:

MUSIC TO MY EARS
By JoAnn Miller

How I long to hear the old hymns
That I sang when just a youth
In the church that I grew up in –
Where I learned the Gospel’s truth.

Those hymns contained great messages
Of Jesus’ love for me
Told how He purchased my salvation
When he died “At Calvary.”

Today’s repetitive choruses speak
To our youth, some people say.
But I wonder how many have ever heard
Those old hymns of yesterday?

“I Can Hear My Savior Calling”
He calls me ‘Just As I Am”
And now “I Belong to Jesus.”
“I’ve Been Redeemed By the Blood of the Lamb.”

Since “I Serve A Risen Savior”
And He washed me white as snow
“Where He Leads Me I Will Follow”
He will “Abide With Me”, I know.

“Love Divine, All Loves Excelling”
“Blessed Assurance”; “Love Lifted Me”
“Halleluia, What A Savior”
Draw me “Nearer My God To Thee.”

“I Have A Song I Love To Sing”
With my voice raised high in praise,
I’ll “Take The Name Of Jesus With Me”
Throughout my earthly days.

He is the “Rock of Ages”
He’s been “My Help in Ages Past.”
So “Count Your Many Blessings”
Knowing His love for you will last.

“I Have A Song That Jesus Gave Me”
“Oh Happy Day”; “Amazing Grace”
”I Will Sing of My Redeemer”
Someday I’ll see Him “Face To Face.”

This is just a tiny sample
Of some hymns that touched my heart
And led me to the Saviour
“Precious Lord,” “How Great Thou Art.”

I pray the songs I’ve mentioned here
By title, line or phrase
Stirs your heart with “Precious Memories”
Prompting you my God to praise.

So “Sing Them Over Again To Me”
Those old hymns I love to hear.
“Sing The Wondrous Love of Jesus”
Ah, sweet music to my ear!

The Deciduous Season

Panorama campus October 2017

We all know people who travel east to enjoy the fall colors. The previous blog included Neil Harris’ photos of our outstanding range of color displayed all around campus. We are wending our way through November with Thanksgiving around the corner and even the windy rainstorm a few days ago didn’t totally divest the trees of their astonishing array of vibrant colors. Big Leaf Maples are wonderful yellow and there is one on Cardinal Lane. Having walked through forests in Olympia with the organized walking group, I am always amazed at the size of those maple leaves!!!

There is something bracing about a cool wind with the smell of leaves down and plants tucking themselves in for approaching winter. Some of us will bake turkeys, some will enjoy Seventeen51 Restaurant and Bistro’s Thanksgiving dinner, and others will band together and sample food aplenty in our surrounding area.

Our campus is now presenting a challenge to our grounds crew. They have just taken down the whimsical outdoor drive-in theater display featuring “Pumpkin-zilla” playing there. That crew is wonderfully imaginative in doing these displays. They always bring smiles and much comment as we discover hidden additions to the theme.

2017 Pumpkin Display created by Panorama’s Grounds Crew

There is another thing that must drive the Grounds crew crazy in this season. All of the deciduous trees do not drop leaves within a given time frame, of a week, two weeks, whatever. They simply shed leaves in their own rhythm. The firs are always dropping needles, we know. But this season of wind and rain produce such a raining down of needles that it is hard for the Grounds crew to keep up.

At the recent Resident Council-sponsored meetings of all residential units on campus, we heard from our Chief of Operations about the strain put on the Grounds crew in all the neighborhoods. The goal is to keep roadways and walkways free of perhaps slippery, dying leaves and to keep our homes looking pleasing.  Maintaining our grassy areas relies on downed leaves not killing the sod. There is another reason to manage the dying bits of biomass. The needles will clog downspouts and result in backed up water, leaks, and higher maintenance. Those of us living under Douglas firs know how many needles are flying about us at all times of the year, but especially now in the fall season. We love those trees and wouldn’t trade them for anything.

However, they do all add to ambient noise in our neighborhoods. In my mind, this comes with the territory. Not in the minds of our two furry tabby cats. They have become inured to the blowers on our front walk way, driveway, and patio. What they have trouble with is the sound walking on the roofs make and blowing off those accumulated needles. Each has found a dark place to hide until the workers have moved on to the next roof.

We all know of or heard the grousing about leaf blowers, day in and day out…but the cost of time and work with rakes instead of blowers would increase the budget for maintenance tremendously. We have come to just turn up the radio or TV volume as we go about our in-house tasks…and are thankful that it isn’t us having to do this awful and repetitive job!!! We walk everywhere on campus and appreciate that walk-ways are kept safe and clear. We, along with everyone else I am sure, enjoy the weekends when the Grounds crew have time off unless there is a weather event that undermines that. Let’s all enjoy the quiet on the weekends and revel in the wonderful color that we enjoy here!

We want to present ourselves the very best we can, looking to our future population choosing us as a retirement community. Panorama is doing a fine job of keeping us trimmed up under trying conditions. So, let’s all give the guys and gals a nod of thanks and just know that soon the blowers will abate.

Enjoy your Thanksgiving and these wonderful colors so very close to home.

Sandra Bush
November, 2017

Bursting Colors of Autumn

The colors of autumn are truly remarkable throughout our campus. This has created an irresistible muse for one resident photographer in particular. Neil Harris is one of many talented individuals who have chosen Panorama as their retirement playground. Like so many of his neighbors, Neil graciously shares his talents with our community and we couldn’t be more grateful. After all, that is precisely what makes Panorama thrive. Here’s a selection of his recent work – enjoy!

Panorama campus October 2017

Panorama campus October 2017

State Capitol in Olympia, WA – October 2017

Aquatic and Fitness Center at Panorama – October 2017

Chehalis Western Trail near Panorama – October 2017

Patrons Plaza at Panorama – October 2017

Lower Lewis Falls in southern Washington – October 2017

Lower Lewis Falls in southern Washington – October 2017

A buck enjoying a crisp morning at Panorama – October 2017.

Bus Flight to Lawton (Excerpt)

Bus Flight to Lawton (Excerpt from Convent to Catwalk)
by Mary Jo Shaw, Author, Panorama Resident

(I was on my way to my mission to teach in Lawton, OK).

Alone and feeling self-conscious, I was dressed in my long, black and white habit in 1967, the year the popular TV show The Flying Nun was playing its first season. Because of the wacky, naïve, silly antics played by Sally Fields, I felt the public thought some real nuns were somewhat ridiculous, especially the young ones.

I chose a place to attract the least attention in the crowded Greyhound Bus station in San Antonio, Texas. My chair happened to be in the center of the large room. The hustle and bustle of travelers alternated with periods of still and quiet.

A wound up, small, five-year old boy, began running back and forth on the long, shiny floors in the wide space between my strip of seats and the row facing me. He’d pick up momentum, then slide the last few yards in his slick-soled Buster Browns. After about eight such rotations, he noticed my black garments. He continued his laps, but as he passed me, he slowed down to study my presence.

I strained not to play, entertain, or converse with him like I normally did with my students or when introduced to little ones. I was familiar with out-of-the-mouths-of-babes incidents. I didn’t want this babes’ attention, not in this place, not while I was alone, and certainly not while everyone was noticing my growing unease.

My head was down, but distracted from my book. My headpiece failed to conceal my eyeballs from the crowd as I watched his footsteps.

At his third time of pausing and staring for about fifteen seconds to ogle me from head to foot, I kept my head bent toward the pages in my lap, completely ignoring him.

The little sprinter stopped short, parked his feet firm and far apart. He stared at me with hands on his hips and blurted out for the entire station audience to hear, “CAN YOU FLY-Y-Y?”

Travelers snickered. Newspapers jerked closer to their faces. Complete silence.

I lifted my head, stared the boy down and gave him a loud and slow response, “Little fella, if I could fl-y-y-y, I wouldn’t be sitting in this bus station.”

Newspapers collapsed. Surprised at my own clever response, I smiled across the crowd to relax myself and others. Everyone laughed and applauded. “Way to go, Sister!”

That little boy didn’t know how much I detested The Flying Nun.
————

Mary Jo Shaw
Great gifts!
Author, Convent to Catwalk
maryjoshaw3@gmail.com (for more info and source for a book copy)

Welcoming Change with Open Arms

It’s time to write something for the blog again.  I haven’t written for months.  The reason is that I have been trying to handle the changes in my life.  Most of us have experienced a bunch of change in our lives if we have lived for any time at all.  Bryan Willis, the guru of our writing group, Panwriters, recently gave us an assignment to list all the homes in which we have lived from birth to the present time.  Then we were to write about the smallest one of those homes.

I began listing homes.  I went into quite a reverie about where I had lived. I compiled a list of 45 different homes in the 82 and one-half years of my life.  In the past two months I moved into home 45—the 5th home I have occupied in Panorama’s complex.  For each one of those 45 homes a change has occurred in my life—some of them major changes.  Change is one of the facts of life that every one of us who live in Panorama must face.  We are seasoned changers.  We expect to change.  We know that coming to Panorama or any other retirement community isn’t going to suddenly stop change.  In fact, we call this a Continuing Care Retirement Community, and that means that if we change, the community still has a place for us and will continue to guide and support us.

So, I have been dealing with change in my life and writing for the blog was set aside for a time.  In December, my companion with whom I was living began to have some health problems.  Our agreement was that we would live together in her home, but, since both of us had cared for a period of time for a spouse who subsequently died, we would not take on the task of caregiving for each other.  I didn’t want to burden her with my care nor did she want me to be burdened with her care.  For several years we had a very meaningful relationship with each other that filled our lives with caring and love.  We did some traveling, attended lots of concerts, visited each other’s family members, and supported each other in our own little life interests and projects.

Her health began to worsen and she moved into the Convalescent and Rehabilitation Center to receive the care she needed.  I remained at our home.  But, I was cared for, as well.  I realized that she would not be coming back to live with me.  Her health was too fragile and deteriorating.  I visited with Panorama’s leadership team of social workers and those in charge of housing and we came up with a solution to meeting my own need.  I agreed to take an apartment in the Quinault building.

Then, I faced the task of packing my possessions and moving them to my new apartment.  Again, Panorama and I worked together to accomplish the move by July 1st.  I am now comfortable in my new apartment.  Unfortunately, my companion died the day after July 4th.  Her family was provided guidance and help to accomplish vacating her home.  The other day, I happened to walk through the area and saw the evidence and heard the sound of working that indicated the home was being prepared for the next occupant(s).

And, here I am writing for the blog again.  Declining health of a companion, changing relationships, moving to a new apartment, and making plans to live alone again aren’t easy things to accomplish.  Each one of them has its own degree of pain.  But change is a fact of life and beyond the change is more life.  We don’t necessarily welcome change with open arms, but, with help and compassion, change brings new life and we go on.

A 4-Day Trek Through the Northwest Peninsula

Written by Panorama resident, Sandra Bush | September 2017. 
Photos taken by Bill Leppard and Tim and Tam Alden.

Panorama supports and engages our active population in many ways. The outings programs of strolls, walks, and hikes have been augmented by some experimental four-day outings for active residents. This longer type of outings allow more leisurely hiking time instead of hurrying to get back to the bus before awful traffic begins. Steve Pogge and his guide assistant, Wren offered a trip to hike the Northwest Peninsula, and I thought I might share some of what this outing provided. Eight of us came prepared for rain for all four days. We stowed our hiking poles and belongings on the bus and we headed to our destination. We were pleasantly surprised by the weather.

Big Quilcene River

We took a lovely two-hour walk along the Big Quilcene River before lunch. These lunches are usually healthy and prepared by us or Steve out of the back of the bus and on picnic tables in the deep forest or along the Puget Sound or a water source.

This was followed by a visit to Bandy Farms on the way to Sequim. Such a fun surprise! This acreage has been described as unique or unusual. A carver turned his fence posts into works of fun art as well as building a pink castle when neighbors took exception to his various creations. There were so many, I’ve just included a single photo. It surely makes one want to go back to see them all.

Bandy Farms

Before getting to our rooms in Port Angeles, we had stretched our legs by walking down to and along the Dungeness Spit, the largest natural spit found on the West Coast. We dined at a restaurant named “The Cedars” before checking in to The Red Lion with marvelous views of the water.

The Alden’s captured this special sunrise from our hotel the next morning

There is a lovely paved waterfront one-mile trail in front of the hotel that many hikers take advantage of in the early morning.

An amazing ocean figure in mosaic sits by the interpretive center along a walk to a tower overlooking the waterway.

As rain was forecast for the afternoon, Steve decided we’d hike Hurricane Ridge in the morning to avoid a cold, wet and windy afternoon hike. Three hearty souls hiked up a 4-mile steep trail while the rest of us opted for the bus, allowing us to hike to the over-look of the amazing Olympic Mountain range from the Interpretive Center atop Hurricane Ridge. It was hard enough for the rest of us. It was too late in the season to view Olympic marmots as they were getting snuggled for winter. Wren had given us a quick overview of marmots and we learned that they are a distinct group, different from Cascade Range or Vancouver Island populations. But hikers always need to watch for mountain goats as they can get very aggressive and aren’t native to this range.

Our Assistant Guide, Wren, hiking Hurricane Ridge

Panorama Residents hiking Hurricane Ridge

While no goats or marmots were present, the views were just awesome and what did we find at the end of the puff? Steve had prepared hot soup for our lunch along with the usual sandwich making fare. What a guy! This was accompanied by a slight flurry of snow! We were so glad that Steve rearranged our itinerary; it may have gotten more than interesting up there if we’d been there in the afternoon, as planned!

The morning activity was to go on an Underground and History tour of Port Angeles, but we were rescheduled for the afternoon, and we enjoyed some amazing history of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, including the elevation of the early outpost city that became Port Angeles. It was built on the mudflats; further up the hill, the British and military owned the higher ground. Town engineers elevated the downtown to avoid tidal flooding of buildings on the mudflats! With no heavy equipment, the entire downtown was elevated one-story. We went under some buildings that then used the second floor for their first floor. The engineering alone was incredible. Red Cedar posts dating from the original construction were in amazing shape. Their oil content has preserved them for over a century.

The usual “happy hour” in the guide’s room was cancelled as we prepared (after a long day) for a wonderful “family style” dinner at a renowned restaurant. Sabai Thai Restaurant, which had rave reviews from best places in the Northwest by Frommer’s Travel Guidebook, served wonderful food. The 10 of us shared nine different dinners suggested by the staff and it was so delicious and special. We had the option of ordering a dish that we wanted specifically, but we all decided to share to taste various dishes. Happy but tired hikers retired back to their rooms and opted not to visit a modern outdoor sculpture park as the night sky was imminent.

After the second night, it was time to bring our bags back to the bus in the morning for our exploration of Marymere Falls and to the Moments-in-Time hike which lead us to Crescent Lake. Delightfully, we got to experience the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center after breakfast. It would have been hard to see the outdoor installations by artists had we gone after the Thai dinner. It was entertaining to wander around that acreage and see things mounted in the trees, under leaves on the ground, and to experience artists’ way of using the out-of-doors for art installations.
(More pictures can be enjoyed on their website: http://www.pafac.org/)

Photograph by Bill Leppard

We headed to the Storm King Ranger Station to hike up to Marymere Falls. We meandered on a wonderful blanket of fir needles with no roots or rocks to trip over. Then we found the way up to the waterfall overlook. Gads, the usual roots and rocks and steps to negotiate brought us to wonderful views of the two-tiered waterfall.

Steve explained a magical exercise in fooling the eye/brain connection. He explained that if you looked at the same segment of falling water for 15-30 seconds and then shifted your eyes to the right, the granite rock actually seemed to move up in the segment as wide as your view was of the falling water. Many of us were able to experience it, but it left you off center for a bit while your brain reorganized its visual input. What was wonderful was that by mid-week, we had so much of the trails to ourselves.

Branching off from the Marymere Falls trail was a lovely, quiet walk amid Moments-in-Time’s large trees. Steve suggested that the walk to lunch be carried out in silence to appreciate what the forest has to offer in serenity. We often do silent walks with no talking and it is a wonderful rest for the mind and body as we walk among the big trees. This trail led us to Crescent Lake Lodge where those interested could rent a kayak or canoe. The views from the picnic table where lunch were arrayed were just amazing. The lunch arrayed by the edge of the lake was lovely and we were visited by a family of cute and persistent ducks that popped out of the water to try and cadge some food, but it is never appropriate to feed wildlife animals.

Then we headed to our final night in Forks. Along the way, we got to hike down to Mora Beach, all 120 steps down and back up. Tidal issues made very little sand available, with many large logs/trees that had been washed up for a long period of time, but many individuals scrambled over these obstacles to get some beach time. Two of us elected to sit in the cool shade of a large log and skipped the scramble. Such a lovely day we had. Sunny, and most of all: NO RAIN!!!

This final evening, we enjoyed happy hour in the guide’s rooms. While Steve’s trips do not promote alcoholic drinking, there were a couple of jugs of “Mississippi Mud” dark ale, various wine and sparkling water while participants discussed the pros and cons of activities for future trip-planning. The Native-owned restaurant he had planned for dinner was closed Tuesday nights, so the pizza parlor on Main Street Forks provided a venue to further the fellowship. A poster on the wall of Ruth Orkin (a photographer) depicts a performance, engendered Wren’s further research which found a woman bucking early stereotypes and working in a men’s world back in the 1950s, traveling alone in Europe!   We always manage to learn a lot from Steve’s outings, even when they are unplanned!

An earlier trip also visited a record-breaking Cedar Tree that had recently fallen not far off the road. It had to give up its status as the world’s biggest Cedar, but to view and walk around it was meaningful and powerful.

On the way to Aberdeen and back home, we also experienced what could only be called a Dr. Seuss forest. This was a segment of coastal trees above Beach #1, (yes that is its name) with amazing burl structures on them. Based on Wren’s research, the burl structures don’t kill the tree and many things cause the tree to burl. This happens along coastal waterways and not far inland. But this was a literal forest of them in a small area. An example of this is below, along with Steve and his wonderful Indian flute, making the experience somewhat other-worldly.

Traveling with Steve is always an adventure!

Steve’s trips are always so well-planned and scouted. A highlight is usually a stop at an ice cream purveyor on the way home. This time, we stopped at Scoops in Aberdeen with way too many selections of ice cream flavors. Learning about the history and enjoying out-of-door places that our wonderful Northwest Peninsula provides is always rewarding.

Treat yourself to one of these wonderful Panorama outings if you can!

A Resident’s Perspective – Barbecue

Written by Panorama resident, Verl Rogers. September 2017

The other day on the back deck of the Quinault we had a party.  It brought about 28 residents of Panorama Assisted Living together for hot dogs, potato salad, potato chips, beer or wine.  We lived it up, and I was glad to see everyone coming out.  We have a few hermits and I like it better when they socialize.

A few of our group need daily help in getting up and getting dressed; more need supervision in medication.  Most of us have an impairment of some kind that is a hindrance to living independently.  We take prescribed pills daily, for heart or liver or stomach trouble, as well as pain pills.  Sore backs are common.  Myself, I take 6 pills each morning and 8 at bedtime, with no supervision.

A few months ago, I complained of my 14 daily pills to my doctor.  He went through the list and said, “Take them all!”

The group I saw are mostly rich, shaky, old people.  The rent begins at $4000 per month, three or four times more than rent for ordinary independent living.  We are paying for the many extra services we need from being ill and feeble.  A small example is at the table, where a few of our number need help to cut their food into bite-size pieces.  The staff workers do very well for us in big chores and small; I am happy to be here.

You can’t see the money; we dress in blue denims and well-worn shirts and tops.  Conversation is ordinary.  We don’t think of ourselves as rich, though most of us saved and invested our money to get here.  I would like to spend my last dollar on the day I die, though I’m not sure how to do it.  We still look for bargains at the store.

Two people have birthdays today, and we sang “Happy Birthday” for them.  Somehow, those little events made everyone smile.  Our group is mostly in the eighties or nineties.  Helen Blair is 97.  Our oldest resident, Russell Day, 104, (no birthday today) was there eating a hot dog.  He told me he was born in 1912, and graduated from high school in 1930, when I was 3.

Helen’s birthday reminded me of the story of a 10-year-old girl. She was introduced to an old lady, and the child asked, “How old are you?”  The reply was “97 years.”  This was too much for the little girl, who thought her teacher was impossibly old at 30.  She hemmed and hawed.  “Er – um – did you start counting at one?”

Today the staff workers, 12 of them, all came out and ate hot dogs, salad and chips with the residents.  The Administrator gave out coffee mugs as door prizes.  The staff workers like their jobs; one told me it is like helping her grandparents.

All in all, the party united our group and lifted morale mightily.

A Successful Farewell to the Heart Bank Party

On Tuesday, September 12th we celebrated the legacy of PC Care and its Heart Bank coin boxes during the Heart Bank Farewell Party.  Seventy-five people collectively contributed $3,260.29 which will be used exclusively to enrich the lives of residents living in the Convalescent and Rehabilitation Center (C&R).

As volunteers were busy counting coins, guests took some time to touch and feel some of the items that have been purchased through past Heart Bank contributions and enjoy a treat.

Carol Lambert, Joe Zabransky, Bob Bowers, Boh Bohman and Kathy Houston busy counting coins. 

 Mary Jo Shaw entertains guests  

Heart Bank contributors enjoy discussing how their contributions will enrich lives.

Residents in the C&R benefit every day from your contributions. Because of your generous charitable gifts nearly $30,000 will be spent this year to support activities meant to enrich the lives of your neighbors in the C&R. A few of these activities include: massage therapy, music and memory therapy, chair yoga, live entertainment, movies, “The General Store”, a holiday gift for every resident, and so much more!

You have a heart of gold! A thank you gift for everyone who attended the Heart Bank Farewell Party.

The Heart Bank Farewell Party was the perfect way to bid “farewell” to the tradition of gathering coins to support life enriching activities in the C&R.  If you missed the party, it is never too late to make a contribution! Any contribution to Panorama’s Office of Philanthropy can be directed to enrich lives in the C&R any time of the year.

 

The Office of Philanthropy’s mission is to enrich the lives of Panorama residents through the acquisition and use of charitable gifts. It is committed to provide enriching experiences, programs, and other amenities throughout the continuum of care.

 

The Benefits of Yoga and an Update from your Panorama Yoga Team

Written by Panorama resident and yoga instructor, Charles Kasler. 
August 2017

Panorama has a very active yoga/meditation community. We are friends as well as we practice together and look after each other. These pictures are from our annual summer solstice vigil in the Pea Patch garden. We also had a recent workshop on breathing. Our next event will be high tea for the fall equinox in the Seventeen51 Restaurant and Bistro.

Why is yoga so popular with seniors? Because it slows down aging, helps us feel better and maintains quality of life. There are five primary areas in which yoga can be therapeutic for seniors:

  1. Preventative – high blood pressure, heart disease, falls
  2. Curative – musculoskeletal conditions (this also requires maintenance)
  3. Maintenance – maintaining quality of life with chronic illness such as muscular dystrophy or rheumatoid arthritis
  4. Palliative – improving quality of life with terminal illness such as cancer

[yoga is medically recognized as a support for side effects of chemotherapy: fatigue, nausea, digestive problems, loss of appetite, anxiety & depression, weakened bones, pain, nervous system disturbance, cognitive problems]

  1. Rehabilitation – after heart attack, stroke, surgery

Yoga massages the muscles: relieving chronic pain and tension, reducing fatigue, improving flexibility and symmetry, toning and strengthening muscles as well as connective tissue. Balance also improves.

Yoga stimulates circulation of all of the fluids: blood, the lymphatic system, and the very fluids that are within and surround each cell of the body. This improved circulation lessens stress on the heart, lowers blood pressure, and promotes healthy metabolism of each cell. It thins the blood and increases the number of red blood cells. Improved lymphatic drainage boosts immunity and enhances detoxification. Circulation to the skin improves as well. The heart becomes stronger even as its workload lessens. The resting heart rate lowers. Improved circulation transports hormones released by the endocrine system.

Skeletal structure improves: joints align increasing their range of motion as well as being supported by (newly toned) muscles. Pain in the joints may decrease, especially the back. Bone density increases through weight bearing. Symptoms of arthritis can diminish. Posture improves dramatically. Movement is more efficient and requires less effort. Balance and kinesthetic awareness improve. Feet open up.

The respiratory system functions better as we learn proper breathing: we release tensions that restrict the breath, the volume of air we breathe increases, exchange of waste products improves, cellular respiration improves. Longer and slower breathing is therapeutic.

Digestion and elimination improve: the entire digestive system is massaged, stress releases, and dietary changes contribute to better digestion.

Organs and glands: yoga contributes to hormone regulation and regulates the adrenals. Yoga can lower blood sugar levels as well. Body weight may normalize. Yoga sometimes lowers the need for medications.

The nervous system: the entire practice shifts us from the stress response to the relaxation response. The mind quiets, concentration and alertness improve, mood becomes more positive – happier, better self-esteem, better sleep, more body awareness. Relationships may improve and addictions may have less power over us.

Immune function improves: as the body functions more optimally, we are better able to fight off disease and infection.


 

Becoming Juliette

Written by Panorama resident, Ann Friedman. August 2017

Several years ago, we had a golden retriever and a pound hound dog. Both wonderful dogs in their own way. They played, slept, aged, and became ill together. Ultimately they were euthanized together in our home.  We said, “We never want another dog!”  It was just too painful a process to lose them.

That lasted about two weeks. The house was just too quiet. No one greeted us when we got home. No one let us know that the mail had arrived. No one was handy to scarf up a stray Cheerio. Something was missing. Should we get another dog?  Richard said, “I don’t want to vacuum up all that dog fur anymore!” I said, “I don’t want the hard work of a puppy.”  We both agreed on a non-shedding adult dog…but what?

We found that there were several choices. Some breeds had hair that would need to be groomed. There were hairless dogs (no!!). Then Richard read about Greyhounds. They don’t shed much and have calm temperaments.  But whoever sees a Greyhound and how would we get one? The closest breeder was hundreds of miles away. But, remember, we don’t want a puppy.

Upon further investigation, we discovered organizations that travel to Greyhound racetracks across the country and pick up truckloads of dogs before they can be “put down”. These dogs are spayed or neutered, health checked, vaccinated, tested for cat tolerance, and made available for adoption. They are anywhere from two to five years old. Some have only had one race, others many more. All are fearful to some degree at first. They have never had the same experience with people and things that other dogs have had.

There were a few rescue organizations near our (then) home in Sacramento, CA. We contacted Greyhound Friends for Life and learned that there were some conditions that must be met in order to look at the dogs available for adoption. First, we filled out an application.

That was reviewed and accepted. Next, we had a home check. This is important to make sure your Greyhound will be safe.  Rescued Greyhounds are runners and they have never been in houses before.  Our house, yard, and fence passed inspection.  Last step, actually seeing a live Greyhound up close and personal.

We drove the fifty miles or so to a lovely Greyhound refuge in the Sierra foothills. There were eight new hounds in the large grassy enclosure. They were big. They were fast.  They all raced towards us in a herd.  It was a little intimidating. They all just wanted attention. We spotted a small Greyhound in the group. It was a female with beautiful black and tan brindled coloring. Racing Greyhounds aren’t bred for specific coat color so you’ll see black, tan, white, spotted, and brindled.

We were attracted to this delicate girl and learned that she had come from a track in Phoenix, AZ. She had raced fifty-three times and come in first or placed twenty-five percent of the time.  She came when we called her by her track name, Juliette, and looked us right in the eyes.  As I began petting her, she leaned against me. Best of all, Juliette was not timid with Richard.  We were smitten. It was the fall of 2009 and we adopted her then and there.

Juliette w Ann

Because racing greys rarely walk on cement or black top, we had to condition Juliette’s paws by giving her short walks at first. She was a little fearful of passing cars and strange men, but loved women. She housetrained quickly using a crate, which she was very comfortable with, and it is what she knew.  Plus, she was unique to greys in that she tolerated our cats.

Juliette w toy

Speed ahead eight years and here we are living in Panorama. Because she no longer has a dog door, Juliette has many more walks. She loves meeting folks on her potty walks and “Walk the Loop” Tuesday evenings. Juliette has helped us meet so many nice people.

But her favorite thing to do is to visit the Panorama dog park. She is there most afternoons and although we were a little wary at first wondering how she would do with mostly small dogs, it was a needless concern. It took a few dog park visits but Juliette is learning how to play. She runs with the other dogs, small and large. She especially likes to chase McTavish, the Scottish terrier, and hang by Trooper, the shepherd. If the small dogs aren’t going as fast as Juliette, she just jumps over them and runs on.  She and Wyatt, the dog, share playground monitor duties barking and scolding the others if they get too rowdy.  Everyone gets along and enjoys their time together.  The people do, as well.

Juliette in Pool

In reviewing Juliette’s adoption papers and track record in preparation for writing this article, I discovered she is actually a year older than I remembered. She will be twelve this September. That’s very old for a Greyhound but you’d never know it by seeing her.  She is peppy and excited for every walk and dog park visit.  We think she is finally having the puppyhood she missed by being a professional runner.  Everyone thinks she is a lucky dog, but we think we are the lucky ones for owning Juliette, the Greyhound.

A Resident’s Perspective – Triple Creek Farm

Written by Panorama resident, Cleve Pinnix. August 2017

Some 30 Panorama residents enjoyed a wonderful tour of Triple Creek Farm on July 27. The farm is home to Ralph Munro, the retired Secretary of State of Washington, and a member of the Panorama Board of Directors. Ralph was our guide for a walking tour of the property, and then hosted us for a delightful salmon luncheon.

Munrovisit3Triple Creek Farm is located along the shore of Eld Inlet, just west of Olympia. The property is a mix of forest and fields, with the Munro home looking across a small tidal stream to the inlet. The land has a remarkable history of Native American use over the centuries. Ralph led us to an archaeological site along the shoreline that was the subject of a decade-long study by faculty and students of South Puget Sound Community College, in cooperation with the Squaxin Island Tribe. This peaceful shoreline is graced by a lovely welcome pole donated from the tribe to the Munro family.

Munrovisit1Ralph and his family have been careful stewards of this unique place, planting trees and protecting the shoreline for decades. They have also donated a conservation easement to the local Capitol Land Trust, ensuring that this land will retain its pastoral quality in perpetuity. Luncheon in the barn capped our visit. Many thanks to the Munro family for their kind hospitality.

Munrovisit2

As it happens, only a few days later, Panorama residents visited Triple Creek again to enjoy the summer gala for the Capitol Land Trust. Panorama is a proud sponsor of this community celebration.

Hikes with Steve – Mt. Rainier Wildflower Trip

Written by Steve Pogge. Photos by Panorama resident, Cindy Fairbrook. August 2017

A small group of residents took three days and circumnavigated Mount Rainier. It was a 400 mile trip in search of wildflowers with Steve Pogge and Mark Akins as hike leaders. We left for this adventure on July 30 and as luck would have it, the flowers were in their prime. The colors were fantastic. We saw not only Lupine, Indian Paintbrush and Mountain Heather but Avalanche Lilies, Sitka Valarium, Bistort, Western Anemone (mouse on a stick), Rosy Spirea, Arnica and assorted other beautiful, colorful and fragrant plants.

Pic 1

Pic 2

We were able to visit the South side of the mountain at the Paradise/Reflection Lake area, the Southwest side at the Ohanopacosh area, the Eastside at Chinook Pass and the Northside at the Sunrise/Borough Mt. area.

Pic 3

We ate, laughed, hiked, toured and had a grand time on our three day adventure. The restaurants and inns were all interesting and lovely in their own way.  Many options were given each day and each person was able to see and do as much as they desired.  Although the terrain was sometimes steep and the elevation high, the beauty of the area was enough to overcome any discomfort we had.

Pic 4

The days were warm but not hot, the skies were cloud free and we often went from early morning to dark to do and see as much as we could. It was an experience that many will take with them for years to come. It reminded me once again of just how beautiful an area we are fortunate to live in.

Steve Pogge Bio

A Resident’s Perspective – Walking the Loop

Written by Panorama resident, Sandy Bush. July 2017

“Walk the Loop” group has been functioning since June 6th for this 2017 summer season. It began some years ago and then Panorama celebrated its 50th Year and bright yellow t-shirts were printed carrying the message, not only of the walking group, but for the anniversary. After attending two Tuesdays of walking, you can get a T-shirt to join the brightly colored gang. There are also yellow bandanas for all the furry walkers.

CaptureEvery Tuesday through August, starting at 6:30 PM officially, a wonderful array of walkers shows up to walk a loop or five of the circle around McGandy Park. For the second year in a row, the local high school marching band came to lead off the group for one circuit on the first Tuesday of the walks. It is fun to walk/march to a band and we made a colorful group. Three-wheeled bicycles, push walkers, canes, walking sticks and wheel chairs are all very welcome.

Many walkers have found the start time somewhat problematic for dinner times and have either started way early or come to the walk later after dinner. The start time doesn’t matter, really, if you are logging your laps on the four-paneled roster sheet kept and updated by the Bartruffs. Getting there before 7:30 PM closing will let you check off the number of circuits you have done that evening. No, it isn’t a contest and if you get there before the lists are up, just add your checks when it is posted and before you go home. If you are new to walking with the group, do sign in on the new walker sheet at the table.

The added fun is a group of six stations on the light bollards with trivia questions and their answers. These have been diligently researched and posted by the Bartruffs. We learn something every Tuesday that we go. Walkers also get to see, talk with and smile at folks they don’t see day to day in their particular interest groups.

When the weather is toasty and legs in shorts are seen around the loop, there is often a water dispenser and cups at the table at the Aquatic Center where all this is happening. One Tuesday, there was a wonderful plate of fruit to help with energy. And now that it is Pea Patch season, lemon zucchini cookies are a treat. The furry walkers can enjoy water from bowls placed at two homes around the loop.

Walkers should wear their SARA buttons and your name tag will help new and other folks learn your names. It is after all a “talk the loop” group as some have named it.

The campus is abloom now and walking gets you all the colors of the hydrangeas. We enjoy how something is always blooming around campus.

So, bring your new neighbors to introduce them to a fun activity in the summer. The last walk always has a treat scheduled and don’t miss that! Catch up on the news of other neighborhoods. Just enjoy the end of the day with a leg stretcher. Happy walking!!!!

Sandy Bio