STOP, POP & GO: Banking on Foods at Panorama

Written by Panorama resident, Mary Jo Shaw. June 2020

Standing with my walker about 30 yards outside the exit of our Quinault Building, I knew something special was going on in the northwest area of our Panorama campus. Thurston County was moving to Phase Three, but Panorama was opening, thankfully for our benefit, with narrower, firmer guidelines. 

That special day, residents seemed to be leaking from nicks and crannies – enthusiastically aiming for the same destination. Some clung to plastic or paper bags. Others gripped envelopes. Cars were neither bumper-to-bumper nor inching along, but they too were headed toward the same destination.

I smiled, returning energetic arm waves, as my walker turned into the identical direction. I hadn’t been outside much, so instead of my daytime PJs, I actually “dressed-up”in my jogging white-striped black pants and matching top. No need to figure out how to apply make-up again – my mask covered my nose to chin, as did masks of all shapes, colors, and designs of my family of friends. I didn’t recognize eyeballs of many, but called out a Hi there!!  

“Oh, Mary Jo, it’s you. Clever signs!” I kept forgetting I was wearing my quickly hand-printed sign I had made for fun. It read: “I’m Mary Jo Shaw!” When I’d see my reflection, I didn’t recognize myself. My big floppy hat covered my forehead. My glasses turned brown outdoors, and I was wearing that mask.

We were traveling between 10 o’clock to noon to the Thurston County Food Bank Drive-Thru Donation Drive in the covered entrance of our Aquatic & Fitness Center. Cars, canes, walkers, scooters delivered non-perishable food items. Others gripped sealed envelopes with checks made out to “Thurston County Food Bank”.

Drivers who steered under the extended covering would STOP under the covered entrance and POP their trunks open to drop off their donation without leaving their car. Staff and employees removed bags of foods or an envelope with a donation check from the trunk. In a matter of seconds, the drop-off was completed for that resident and they would GO on their way. The energy at the tables with donated items was eclectic and exactingly organized.

The warm sunshine, cool-in-the-shade weather that God shown down on us enticed our walking and greeting – while distancing to chat with friends we hadn’t seen in months!

What an outing! I’m going to make myself get out more often to walk.

It had been a day of giving to the Thurston County Food Bank, but I had received more – blessings of visiting with lovely friends, refreshingly perfect weather, and knowing that Panorama cares about us as they remind us of the restrictions necessary to keep us well. We still have 0 cases of virus on our campus of over 1,200 residents, including the hundreds of staff on our campus daily.

Thank you Panorama for your care for us and helping us care for our off-campus community in need.

I started to tap SEND to this Panorama BLOG when on our Panorama closed circuit TV, News with Lu, announced that in addition to 32 large boxes of foods, those envelopes added up to $10,326!

AMEN . . . let’s go for it again!!

Hopes & Dreams Travel News

People are slowly and very cautiously beginning to hope and dream about future travels! This past month I have had the opportunity to help some Panorama clients with new bookings for late 2021, 2022, and yes, even 2023! This breathes new hope and life back into Hopes & Dreams Travel. Over the past three months, I’ve made approximately 70 booking cancellations . . . so to have the chance to once again work on travel plans was such a treat. This challenging season of COVID-19 has reaffirmed how much I truly love helping people with travel. The joy and excitement that I felt while making those new bookings and talking with clients about their future trips was wonderful! At a time when fifty percent of people in the travel industry have lost their jobs, we are more committed than ever to continuing to help people at Panorama with their travel plans. 

We are getting our first reports of a few small ship cruise lines that will be starting to sail again in July and August. These small ships have far less people, usually 100 or less, and have implemented strict protocols of safety. They are not impacted by the CDC’s current cruise restrictions. American Cruise Lines will offer sailings on the Columbia River and on the Mississippi River in July at 75% percent capacity. UnCruise will be offering some Alaska cruises this summer on a very limited basis. New for 2021, UnCruise is offering 5-night roundtrip Washington itineraries including the Salish Sea, San Juan Islands, and Sucia Island. They also have a 7-night Olympic Wilderness & San Juan Islands itinerary.  These might be great options to consider for travels closer to home. 

Reports are continuing to confirm that travel within the United States will boom in the months ahead. I’ve been thinking and dreaming about a few places on my list, but I will probably not make many personal travel plans until 2021, when it will hopefully be less risky to travel. A few of the places I’m thinking about are Yosemite, South Carolina, and Boston.  There are also so many wonderful options right in our own backyard in the Pacific Northwest! What destinations are you dreaming about? 

Looking ahead, Viking Cruise Lines is now offering Great Lakes cruises and Mississippi River cruises beginning in 2022! We have some people that have expressed interest in going as a Panorama group, so please let me know if that is something that interests you. I will start working on a group if there is enough interest. Also, if you have individual Viking bookings that you would like help with for 2021, 2022, or 2023, please give me a call. I book a lot of Viking cruises and have helpful information and tips to offer. I will also add a special gift to your Viking cruise if you book with Hopes & Dreams Travel!

Below you will find two 2021 trips we are working on. I am taking a cautious approach before coming out with too many new options and want to be sure that it is safe before we resume our group trips. 

April 30 – May 06, 2021
Canadian Rockies by rail and coach from Vancouver to Calgary with roundtrip Panorama transfers

Explore the majestic Canadian Rockies by train with two days in GoldLeaf rail service on the Rocky Mountaineer train from Vancouver to Kamloops to Banff. Then spend some time sightseeing in Banff as well as 2 days/nights in Lake Louise. Next, we will make our way to Calgary for some sightseeing and an overnight before flying back to Seattle.  

Prices start from approximately $4,899 per person based on double occupancy or $6,750 per person for single occupancy for this 8 day/7 night journey. This trip includes GoldLeaf rail service on the Rocky Mountaineer, tours from Vancouver to Calgary, 7 hotel nights, taxes, and porterage, touring by bus and train, airfare from Calgary to Seattle and roundtrip Panorama transfers. Trip will be escorted with a minimum of 16 people. Hold your spot with $1,000 per person deposit payable by check. Travel insurance is additional. 

October 23 – 30, 2021   
UnCruise – Rivers of Wine & History
7 nights on the ss Legacy
Roundtrip Portland, OR with optional transportation from Panorama

Join us for an adventure on the Columbia River in October 2021! We will sail roundtrip Portland on the ss Legacy, which holds just 86 guests. Ports include Astoria, Hood River, then we will pass through the Bonneville locks, and up to the Snake River with a side trip to Walla Walla. The cruise will also include a stop at the Maryhill Museum, as well as some wineries in Walla Walla and the Willamette Valley, with food and wine pairings and events along the way. UnCruise offers included excursions and amazing landscapes from sea to river on this unique journey. There’s no better way to discover the natural treasures of Washington and Oregon than from the decks of a small ship.

Prices have been lowered and now start from approximately $4,920 per person based on double occupancy, which includes cruise fare, port charges, and taxes. Additional savings are available if you have previously cruised with UnCruise. Gratuities, travel insurance and transfers to/from Portland are additional. Call today for more details, or if you simply want to add your name to the list of people who are interested!  You can then decide by June or July if you would like to put a deposit on any trip. 

To contact Hopes & Dreams Travel, you can leave a message at x5112 or call 253-931-0909. You can also email us at Hopesanddreamstravel@gmail.com. We look forward to helping you with group or individual bookings when you are ready to travel again!

Panorama Penthouse?

Written by Panorama resident, Mary Jo Shaw. May 2020

One day during this stay-at-home restriction, I stepped outside onto our balcony and eyed a woman walking through the covered parking lot for Quinault residents. “Hi there!!” I called out at a proper level of hearing that far away. She looked around, continued walking until hearing, “Hey…I’m up here!”

She gazed up, doing a complete 360.

“You missed me. I’m at your right. Look up to 5th floor.”

“Oh! Hi, there, Mary Jo! How are you doing?”

“I’m doing great! But who ARE you? I don’t recognize your eyeballs!”

She laughed heartily, pulling her mask down from her face, and responded, “I’m Pat! You have a great view from up there, don’t you?”

“Oh, yes, and we’re blessed in many other ways.”

I watched as she headed toward Circle Loop. What she didn’t know!

One example: We selected a very small apartment on the top floor of the Quinault Building. All my 50 years of marriage, I’ve wanted the smallest kitchen possible, but it needed to have lots of storage.

Reader, see you grinning, “Sounds like an oxymoron, Mary Jo!”

Hey, we got it! My husband calls it the Panorama Penthouse. With pantry pull-outs, I can double stack cans, front to back, in each of the four long drawers. Cabinets have things we really don’t need to keep…containers that I might need sometime!  Why have a large kitchen floor to keep clean?

I can stand at my kitchen sink, turn, and stir a cooking pot without moving a foot!Yes, the exercise would be good, but I have the option of walking through the hallway, family room, etc. for extra mileage. I actually do that at times, with my iPhone in my pocket to tract my distance. A quarter-mile walked trumps a quarter-mile in a recliner watching TV. Even then, if I want to watch or just listen, I can easily be tuned-in in this convenient, small place.

I turned to come back inside the apartment, but noticed Assisted Living activity coordinator, Stephanie, assisting a resident getting started on a walk. Pointing to the opposite side of the parking lot, they headed my way. I called out, louder than I had for Pat.  “Hey, Stephanie!” She, too, looked around.

“Over here…up high!” Both arms swung huge curves over my head right to left.

Stephane’s body language told me she was clueing in Ms. Assisted Living Woman. They nodded toward each other, waved back, and headed my way…a tad more than just moseying along. For about 20 seconds, we could not see each other because of the garage roof blocking the sidewalk view.

However, when they could see me again, they both wore big smiles and returned more arm-greetings. Emotionally I “heard” their hearts of happy excitement.

Their alert, quick pace remained until they turned and were just below my balcony. Now I could use a lower volume, “I miss playing piano on Mondays during lunchtime in Assisted Living.”

Stephanie’s response stirred up my thoughts. “Hopefully, it won’t be long!” was music to my ears…way up in our Panorama Penthouse!

Looking Back at Panorama

Submitted by Resident Archivist, Deb Ross – May 2020

In the next couple installments of Looking Back at Panorama we’ll spend some time with the well-known watercolor of the David and Elizabeth Chambers farm, by artist Edward Lange. The painting was likely created some time in the 1890s. We are looking roughly south from Willow Street; the southern lobe of Chambers Lake is visible as a sliver of blue in the distance. The  homestead was at the current site of the Chalet building. If you look closely, you’ll see two women in bicycles wheeling around the driveway to the home. A Smithsonian article stressed the importance of the bicycle craze to women’s empowerment in the 1890s: 

Bicycles extended women’s mobility outside the home. A woman didn’t need a horse to come and go as she pleased, whether to work outside the home or participate in social causes. Those who had been confined by Victorian standards for behavior and attire could break conventions and get out of the house.

Suffragist Susan B Anthony said that the bicycle “did more to emancipate women than anything in the world.” 

For your own closer look at the painting, stop by the interpretive panel outside the Chalet. 

A Reminder From The Emotional Support Team

Submitted by the resident group, Emotional Support Team – May 2020

 The Emotional Support Team (EST) is composed of Panorama resident volunteers who have professional training and experience helping people through times of trauma. During a disaster such as the current pandemic, they are available to provide emotional support for people who may be having a difficult time enduring isolation, anxiety, fear, crippling frustration or similar feelings. 

The EST will work with Panorama Social Services Staff in times of disaster to complement their program and will make referrals to them for further assistance when requested.  It is not the purpose of the EST to provide long-term care.

To request assistance from the EST, dial x6006 from any Panorama phone or 360-413-6006 from a cell phone or any landline phone. This telephone number is only for leaving a voice message, however, members of the EST will check for messages on a daily basis and respond as quickly as possible.

Trash Talk – Tips on Recycling at Panorama

Submitted by Panorama Green Team – May 2020

PAPER AND PAPER PRODUCTS

The LeMay posters that are affixed to each large dumpster list the following paper product items that can be put in the bins: Cardboard (flattened); magazines, catalogs, newspapers, and mail; cereal and food boxes.

To expand on this a bit, paper product items that MAY be put in the bin include: clean flattened cardboard, magazines, catalogs, newspapers (without plastic bags), office paper, envelopes, opened or un-opened junk mail, and chip board (cereal boxes, tissue boxes, cracker boxes, and similar). The small plastic sheets in window envelopes and tissue boxes do not need to be removed.

Paper product items that MAY NOT be put in the bin include: cardboard with grease or food residue (such as pizza boxes), waxed cartons (such as those used for milk, broth, soups, frozen foods), plastic coated paper (such as coffee cups, paper plates), egg cartons, paper food take-out containers, padded envelopes lined with plastic or bubble wrap, shredded paper, tissues (in this Corona virus age?), paper towels, glossy photographs.

Pay attention to the posted signs at the recycling centers, and if you are not sure about an item, please put it in the trash.

Next month: Take Out Containers

A Resident’s Perspective – Special Pandemic Offers Opportunity

Written by Carolyn Treadway and published May 2020 in The Voice.

Panorama. April 30, 2020. Rhododendrons and azaleas are in breathtaking bloom, cherry blossoms blow around like pink snow, and spring is in full glory. We are so fortunate, sequestered here amidst such beauty––while the COVID-19 pandemic rages across our globe. Thanks to the wisdom, care, and fast-acting leadership of our administrators who closed our campus on March 12, we have been safe and secure in our homes, without one COVID-19 case at Panorama thus far.

All of us have had difficulties adapting to new, rapidly changing realities. But compared to so many whose very lives, income, and housing are at risk daily, we are privileged indeed. Despite the necessity of physical distancing, social connection in times of crisis is crucial. Numerous residents have found safe ways to connect, support each other, and cooperate on projects such as sewing thousands of face masks. Such webs of connection offer a model for our planetary future.

These are liminal times— “in between” times, in transition between the old and the new. The past as we have known it is likely gone forever, and the future is uncertain. Not-knowing is scary, and we long for the security of a predictable “normal.” But what “normal” will allow us (humans and other species) to survive and thrive, into the future?

A tiny virus has brought our world to a sudden halt. This enforced pause gives us an opportunity to see things we might have been too busy to notice: our ecosystems are in crisis; our economic and social systems are not equable for all; climate change is rapidly becoming increasingly catastrophic; “business as usual” is unraveling; our economic model, based upon constant growth, is impossible on a finite planet; and on and on.

We notice, astonishingly, how quickly the world can come together to change when it is imperative. As most of the world shut down to slow the spread of COVID-19, human contribution to climate change became dramatically visible. As greenhouse gas emissions plummeted, air quality improved, smoggy skies cleared, and dolphins came back into the canals of Venice. Our choices and actions do make enormous differences.

What kind of a world do we want? Returning to our previous “normal” will continue to endanger the Earth, our matrix of life, our only home. What needs to change to create a sustainable world? COVID-19 clearly shows how intricately we are interconnected, and what is and is not working. More of the same will not “save” us; nor will technology.

We need shifts in the perceptions and behaviors of humans. We ARE the Earth, part of the integrated ecosystem of Earth, but we are the only species deliberately destroying it for personal gain. To survive, we must learn to live in harmony with the Earth and each other, as indigenous elders could well teach us. Natural systems survive and thrive by cooperation, not by separation and competition.

Let us not waste the opportunity of this unique liminal time to see more clearly what is happening across our planet, to reconnect with the Earth, and to work together to preserve it and each other.

Grey Resistance Indivisible Update

Submitted by resident group, Grey Resistance Indivisible – May 2020

A Word from GRI Coordinator, Mari Stuart

 Hopefully by the time you are reading this we are on the road to recovery. It is time to collect and energize ourselves and most importantly refocus on the upcoming election. Yes, we are in the midst of an ELECTION YEAR. Please select from the ideas below – simple yet effective and NECESSARY steps that will begin to engage you in the election process.

If you have 5 minutes (and who among us doesn’t?) here’s what you can do: Donate to a Senate Candidate in a toss-up race –

  • Michigan: Gary Peters.   petersformichigan.com
  • Colorado: John Hickenlooper. secure.hickenlooper.com
  • Arizona: Mark Kelly. Markkelly.com
  • North Carolina: Cal Cunningham. calfornc.com
  • Kentucky: Amy McGrath  amymcgrath.com

Magnify Your Impact

After you’ve made a donation, email or call a friend and encourage them to follow your lead.

Call Your MOC’s

Thank them for the steps they have taken to speak Truth to Power and encourage them to work in a bipartisan ways where possible. It will take courage and fortitude to meet the present demands of the crisis and also during the re-entry stages to follow.

If you have 30 minutes here is something you can do –

Send postcards to voters in Toss-Up states(follow the suggestions from Jean Garwood in the section titled “Election Team” below.)

If you have 1-2 hours (most of us!)

  • Write letters encouraging people in Toss-Up states to register and/or vote. Again, please follow Jean Garwood’s guide. She is co-chairing the Election 2020 team and would appreciate each of us checking in with her as she is coordinating this effort.
  • Text Banking. We have the opportunity to engage after a brief webinar. Please contact me (email address available to residents on Kya) if interested. We will be targeting those passionate environmentalists who are not so impassioned as voters. All thanks to our Indivisible member Janet Sears whose daughter has reached out to us.

Here are our opportunities to make a difference, engage positively and give us hope.

Mark Your Calendars

In the month of May South Sound Indivisible groups are sponsoring a series of virtual Town Hall events to meet candidates. GRI will send out more information, so watch for it in your email (if you subscribe to our updates).

Important Words from Our Action Groups

Elections Team

We are hard at work continuing to write Letters to Voters. We have prepared 600 letters so far and need a lot more. Go to votefwd.org and register and start writing. It is easy and something meaningful to do during this time. We can also write Postcards to Voters and look forward to Postcard Parties once we can gather again. Contact Jean Garwood (find her on Kya) for address and instructions.

 We can also call our Members of Congress and thank them for supporting us during this crisis. Their contact numbers can be found on line.

Immigration Team

Work continues on our southern border. More later.

Becoming Informed and Taking Action

Each week we are sent a Weekly Call to Action that includes context for most current bills or policies that may call for action. To receive this information, send an email to gri98503@gmail.com.

Grey Resistance Indivisible (GRI) is a local chapter of the national Indivisible organization.

How to Dispose of Prescription Drugs

Submitted by the Panorama Green Team – May 2020

The prescription medicines that benefit you, your family and pets also may harm others and the environment if improperly handled, stored and trashed. Prescription medications fit into a category defined as pharmaceutical waste and require special handling provided by regulated dangerous waste facilities that operate very differently from landfill and recycling operations. By properly disposing of these pharmaceutical wastes you contribute to reducing their damage to air, water, soils, wildlife and eco-systems in addition to accidental consumption by humans and pets.

The complex mixtures of chemicals, metals and other materials in prescribed medicines involve more than pills, ointments, sprays and injections because their packaging and application requirements include a variety of potentially toxic and hazardous materials that also can poison air and water and compromise recycling operations, landfills, and whole ecosystems. Any package or container still half full of its medication deserves proper recycling.

Another dimension to the pharmaceutical waste scene involves separate handling requirements for the category identified as controlled substances. Rules for recycling controlled substances such as opioids, marijuana, and other pain management, stimulant and depression treatments vary by jurisdictions.

Throwing medications and controlled substances in the trash or down the drain qualifies as absolute DO NOT DO choices. Fortunately, a variety of local disposal options make it easier to safely and ethically get rid of your expired and discontinued prescription medications. Knowing the Do and Do Not guidelines will help you plan and toss respectfully and responsibly. High priority directions for responsible disposal handling include:

  1. Do not flush down the toilet or sink.
  2. Do not throw away in your trash can.
  3. Do not add to collections of recycle materials.
  4. Do not bury in the ground.
  5. Do not discard into containers in public places.

Part of knowing the guidelines for proper disposal includes understanding different options for various jurisdictions such as retail businesses, professional organizations, governing entities, universities, hospitals and health care clinics. Your requirements for time, convenience, mobility, and helping hands/services also affect your successful efforts to recycle responsibly.

Panorama residents enjoy the nearby option of bringing no longer needed or wanted prescription medicines to Puget Pharmacy in Panorama Hall, 1751 Circle Lane SE, 360.456.5389. It’s open Monday through Friday, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm. You can also take your prescription medications plus controlled substances to the collection site in the lobby of the Lacey Police Department, 420 College Street SE, Lacey, WA 98503, – (360) 459-4333. The prescription disposal drop box location is available Monday – Friday, 8:00 am to 5:00 pm excluding holidays.


For a comprehensive list of prescription medication disposal services, see

Cabin Fever – A Back Roads Tour

Submitted by resident group, CarTable – April 2020

The following is a fun way to get out of the house safely. It was originally created for the resident CarTable group but we imagine the whole Panorama community could find enjoyment here.

“Hey Cooped-up Car Nutz,

Instead of our outlawed regular meeting at the QCR, here’s something for a sunny day that you can do without breaking any laws; well, social gathering laws anyway. You can run it at any time; there is NO meeting at the start, and it will magically get you back to your house.  A little over 60 miles long; suitable for EVs or bicycles. An EZ 2 hours unless you are a very fast driver and break a few laws.

Hope you have fun!

Later,

gr

General Stuff:

  • Run this whenever you want. 
  • No preliminary gathering.
  • Ends at YOUR house.
  • Most fun on a sunny day with a spouse/partner for navigating.
  • Could be done with an EV or even a bicycle.
  • 0.00 mile is from STOP on pavement at the exit of Panorama Aquatic & Fitness Center. Zero your odometer here.
  • Trip measures with Halda Tripmaster in the PBMGB.
  • If in doubt, go straight or follow the obvious main road.
  • Most importantly, there are no official bio-breaks. Island Johnny at park at end is probably closed; indoor cubbynays at the Shell at 13.87 mile point and Chevron at 19.50 mile point.

0.00   Rt out of Aquatic & Fitness Center.

0.10   Rt at traffic circle.

0.23   Left onto Sleater Kinney.

0.55   L @ STOP on 21st  Ave.

0.80   R @ STOP on Golf Club.

1.02   L onto 26th Ave (NOT Lp).

1.24   L @ STOP to remain on 26th Ave  (NOT Lp).

1.29   R @ STOP onto College.

3.23   Straight @ signal to cross Yelm Hwy; College becomes Rainier Rd.  Follow it.

There are two Xmas tree farms on this stretch, practically across the road from one another.  Notice their names.

13.62 Rainier becomes Minnesota for a short piece.

13.87 L @ STOP.  School straight ahead; SHELL station on L.

14.00 R toward Lawrence Lake; Centre St (Hard to See).

Centre eventually becomes Algyer, which becomes 148th

19.00 R @ STOP onto Vail Rd.

19.50 L @ Chevron onto 153rd toward Lake Lawrence.

21.09 L @ STOP onto Lawrence Lk Rd.

22.07 Straight @ STOP and continue onto Bald Hill Rd.

29.40 Straight into DEAD END towards Deschutes Falls Park.

31.42 Deschutes Falls Park. Probably closed. Don’t congregate here or you’ll get in trouble!  Note cabin; look thru window. 

0.00  Turnaround Time.  Zero odo at white gate and go back out the way you came.

1.70  CAUTION – Exposure Left.

1.98  Straight to get home.

9.33  Straight @ STOP toward Lawrence Lake.

10.31 R onto 153rd – COMES UP QUICK – No other landmark.  Miss this and you’re lost!

11.90  L @  STOP onto Vail Rd  (This is a bit different than how you got here.)

13.64  Keep Right after bridge.

15.50  Keep R onto Vail Cut-off.

17.28  R @ STOP to remain on Vail Cut-off.

19.53  R @ STOP onto Hwy 507 toward Tacoma.

20.10 L before SHELL toward East Olympia (Minnesota again).

20.95  Keep Right to pick up Rainier Rd.

30.72 Straight at signal; Rainier Rd becomes College St.

32.68  L on 26th and find your way home!  No gathering!! 

Looking Back at Panorama

Submitted by Resident Archivist, Deb Ross. – April 2020

We’ll continue our exploration of the images on the Chambers to Chalet interpretive panel at the entrance to the Chalet, with a closer look at the famous Chambers Blackheart Cherry tree, pictured on the panel with numerous members of the Chambers family posing beneath and among the branches of the tree. Here is another image of the tree, taken in full bloom, with David and Elizabeth Chambers’s son, Olympia mayor A.H. Chambers, standing at its base.

David Chambers brought the tree to the homestead in 1853, one of 27 he bought from famed orchardist Henderson Luelling. Within three years the tree was bearing enough cherries for Elizabeth Chambers to make a pie and serve it to fellow settler George Himes, who wrote about the tree many years later. It grew to an immense size, and many articles were written about it, its unusual age (it lived until the early 1920s), and the fact that it bore cherries most or all of its life. In the ‘20s it was necessary to significantly prune it, and pieces of it were preserved and sent to various historical associations in the Pacific Northwest, and to Iowa, the birthplace of Henderson Luelling. On May 4, Kay Coats from the Iowa State Historical Museum located and sent me an image of a slab from the Chambers Cherry that she had just discovered in their collection. 

I like to think that the huge and beautiful cherry tree that is located near the entrance to Boulevard Park, just a couple hundred feet from the site of the Chambers Cherry tree, is a descendant of that earlier tree. The tree was already a few years old in a photograph from the early 1960s, which would make it older and much larger than most cherry trees. It too continues to bear fruit, and its late spring blooms are spectacular.  

Image credits: Washington State Historical Society, Iowa State Historical Society, Deborah Ross

Travel with Hope in 2021

Submitted by Hopes & Dreams Travel – May 2020

The face of travel may look a lot different in 2021!  People will travel again but the process will look different – much like September 11 events forever changed air travel, but helped to better ensure safety. We believe that going forward, cruises and tours will greatly enhance their safety protocols. We are hearing about some of the options that cruises may look to implement going forward:  smaller sailing capacity on the larger ships, filling each ship to only 50-70% of their occupancy, increasing onboard medical staff, having unsold cabins serve as potential quarantine areas in the event of any future outbreak, taking temperatures and conducting health checks daily, extreme cleaning measures taking place a few times each day and hourly in certain public areas of the ships. Nothing has been officially decided but these are some of the discussions and safety reviews that are happening now.

One thing that we hope people may feel more comfortable with is traveling closer to home, within the U.S. and Canada for 2021. There are so many incredible travel options right here!  What destinations do you still have on your list?  Perhaps a visit to Tennessee or the Smokey Mountains?  A New England fall foliage tour?  A train trip through the Canadian Rockies?  Or sailing on the Columbia River in our own backyard with only 70-80 guests on a small ship? 

For 2021, Hopes & Dreams Travel is offering a couple of group trips that may interest you. First, we are planning to reschedule our Cannon Beach group for next spring as well as our Holland America Alaska group for June of 2021.  Here are two new trips that we are offering as well: 

April 30 – May 06, 2021

Canadian Rockies By Rail and Coach From Vancouver To Calgary, With Round-trip Panorama transfers.

Explore the majestic Canadian Rockies by train with two days in GoldLeaf rail service on the Rocky Mountaineer train from Vancouver to Kamloops to Banff. Then spend some time sightseeing in Banff as well as 2 days/nights in Lake Louise. Next we will make our way to Calgary for some sightseeing and an overnight before flying back to Seattle.  

Prices start from approximately $4,899 per person based on double occupancy, or $6,750 per person for single occupancy for this 8 day/7 night journey.  This trip includes GoldLeaf rail service on the Rocky Mountaineer, tours from Vancouver to Calgary, 7 hotel nights, taxes and porterage, touring by bus and train, airfare from Calgary to Seattle and round-trip Panorama transfers. Trip will be escorted with a minimum of 16 people.  Hold your spot with $1,000 per person deposit payable by check. Travel Insurance is additional. 

October 23 – 30, 2021

7 Nights on the ss Legacy UnCruise – Rivers of Wine & History Round-trip Portland, OR With Optional Transportation From Panorama

Join us for an adventure on the Columbia River in October 2021! We will sail round-trip Portland on the ss Legacy, which holds just 86 guests. Ports include Astoria, Hood River, then we will pass through the Bonneville locks, and up to the Snake River with a side trip to Walla Walla. The cruise will also include a stop at the Maryhill Museum, as well as some wineries in Walla Walla and the Willamette Valley, with food and wine pairings and events along the way. UnCruise offers included excursions and amazing landscapes from sea to river on this unique journey. There’s no better way to discover the natural treasures of Washington and Oregon than from the decks of a small ship.

Prices start from approximately $4,920 per person based on double occupancy, which includes cruise fare, port charges, and taxes. Additional savings are available if you have previously cruised with UnCruise. Gratuities, travel insurance and transfers to/from Portland are additional. Call today for more details, or if you simply want to add your name to the list of people who are interested!  You can then decide by June or July if you would like to put a deposit on any trip. 

To contact Hopes & Dreams Travel, you can leave a message at x5112, or call 253-931-0909. You can also email us at Hopesanddreamstravel@gmail.com.  We look forward to helping you with group or individual bookings when you are ready to travel again!

Start Creating for the Upcoming Runway Redux

Submitted by Panorama residents, Karen Romanelli and Judy Murphy – April 2020.

Need a DIY project? It’s for a good cause!

Runway Redux is coming in October, so why not get started on an outfit today?

Use whatever you can find around the house. Buttons, scrap fabric, plastic bags, old sweaters, jeans or costume jewelry can all be used to up-cycle that pair of pants and shirt or dress that was headed for the bin.

Need inspiration?  Just type phrases like “fashion ideas with buttons” or “using old jeans to up-cycle clothes” or “accessories from plastic/aluminum” or “recycle clothing” into your browser and you will find websites with plenty of ideas.

Remember, this is a fundraiser for the Benevolent Fund so please plan on walking the runway or coming to enjoy your creative friends and neighbors. More details in months ahead.

Questions? Contact Karen Romanelli or Judy Murphy (contact information is available to residents through Kya or the Resident Directory).

The Benevolent Fund Continues On

Submitted by resident organization, Panorama Benevolent Fund – April 2020

Neither Snow, Nor Rain, Nor A Pandemic…

has prevented the Panorama Benevolent Fund from bringing residents the personal support they need.

The Financial Assistance volunteers: Kristine Bartruff, Cynthia Daniels, Jay Felzien, and Georgia Vincent, have continued to work (by phone) with grant recipients to assure that their grants were processed as usual. With access to the Benevolent Fund Office down to once a week, Don Whiting (BF Treasurer) followed through with the financial details to make sure grants were received on time. The central thread to the Benevolent Fund’s successful operation at this disruptive time is Connie Cameron, Administrative Assistant, who is in the office every day to help volunteers and residents.

What better time to have emergency access to medical help with the SARA alert system than during these critical days of heightened health concerns. In March alone, 22 residents received assistance from the fire department and 7 residents were transported to emergency care (not COVID-19 related). Your SARA is your personal safety net at unexpected crucial times.

Sponsored by the Benevolent Fund, 3 experienced and caring Social Service Advisors: Tiffany Martin, Corrine Wasmundt, and Sara Wasser, are available every day to give person-centered support to residents as we move through the many phases of aging. These are disorientating times. If you are having difficulty with the disruption of your normal every-day life, please call a Social Service Advisor at x7557 or email socialservices@panorama.org.

As many of you know, the sales activities of the Benevolent Fund were shut down March 11, putting our hard working, dedicated volunteers out of work until management gives an “all clear” signal. The result is that the Acquisition Team is unable to clean out vacated residences and apartments, a major resource of merchandise for sales at Encore Furniture and Books, the Stiles-Beach Barn and the Patio Sale. Consequently, the smooth running sales system the volunteers developed has come to a complete halt—no merchandise, no revenue.  And the story continues…the 2020 Patio Sale has been cancelled.

As with economies all over the world – countries, corporate, small entrepreneurs, and personal – losses are being felt. The Benevolent Fund, also.  Please consider making a donation to the Benevolent Fund to support the promise the Fund intends to keep…even during a pandemic.

Phyllis Freitas, BF President

Resident-Driven Positive Change

Submitted by Panorama resident, Alice Falter – April 2020

We all like to hear about making a change, and about something moving forward. I think this story will put a smile on your face.

New sign created by Dave Taylor and Larry Pratt.

C & R Garden needed a new look, something different and exciting to show off the beautiful flowers that are grown in the raised boxes. Cathy Smith and I, Alice Falter, started last fall to plan the updates to be ready for spring 2020.

Phase 1.  We started with renaming the gardens, “Blue Zone Gardens”.

Phase 2.  We asked Dave Taylor and Larry Pratt from the Wood Shop to create a new sign, and they did a beautiful job. Thank you Dave and Larry for all your time and hard work, we love our new sign for the garden. It really helps to sharpen the new garden look.

Paintings by Neil Harris on the new privacy curtain.

Phase 3.  We then followed what Pam Burdick did out in her Pea Patch garden and that was to put up a privacy screen around the back fence which makes your eye stop at the black privacy curtain and look at the beautiful gardens. Thank you Pam for the great idea. Cathy ordered the curtains and when the weather allowed us to, we put up 100’ of our new privacy curtain on the South West end of the chain link fence, behind the Garden House located out in the Pea Patch.

Paintings by Neil Harris on the new privacy curtain.

Phase 4.  But, an exciting phase was yet to be accomplished. We asked Neil Harris, last fall, to paint large flowers on four boards 24” x 24”and two boards 24” x 30”. He agreed and worked over the winter and created six eye-catching paintings of different flowers. We gave him free range of what flowers to paint and what colors to choose. Neil did an amazing job; the paintings are bright, cheerful and full of love. We hung these pictures up on the privacy covered fence and they are truly works of art. This was an interesting way for Neil to show off his talent and for us to update our garden area. Art work and flower boxes, who knew that would be such an uplifting experience for all to view and admire? Thank You Neil.

Phase 5.  Look for a new painted little potting shed…as weather permits.

Name plaques are being created in the Clay Arts Studio for individual gardens (this work is on pause until the studio reopens).

Phase 6.  Name identification plaques are being made in clay arts for the gardeners who tend the individual garden boxes. This is a work in progress, and as soon as the clay arts room opens again, I can finish the name identification signs for the boxes.

So, you can see we have not been idle out in the Blue Zone Gardens. We love our flowers and love seeing smiles on faces of people walking around our garden boxes. If you are out enjoying the sunshine, come and see our new garden area (while social distancing!), enjoy the intimate feeling our curtain brings and enjoy our private art show. Truly, this is a one-of-a-kind experience for an adult senior living community. This garden speaks volumes; we can heal together, work together and laugh together. That’s what a Blue Zone is truly about. Take a walk and enjoy the Pea Patch; you won’t be disappointed.

Flowers are donated to:

  1.  Friday Share
  2. New Mother’ Day at Food Bank
  3. Senior Day at Food Bank
  4. Meals on Wheels 2020
  5. Assisted living
  6. Special Occasions – C & R
  7. Friends in Recovery

Flower arrangements, and decorative pumpkins are sold in the Gift Shop to help fund our garden projects.

Now, did we put a smile on your face?

Cathy Smith and Alice Falter