My Experience at Arts Walk

Written by Panorama resident, Mary Jo Shaw. September 2019

Our long-awaited day arrived: Arts Walk at Panorama on Thursday, September 5, 2019. 

The 5th floor elevator let us off on the first floor. After about 45 minutes, our table displayed my sets of autobiographies, Convent to Catwalk and the newly printed, Crossroads to Convent, and many all-occasion cards of tangles, paintings and sketches, including an 8” x 10” framed sketch by Chris. We glanced across our assigned area in the newly renovated Convalescent and Rehabilitation Center to the other tables. Judy Murphy fingered lovely background music on the shiny black grand piano.

From 10:00 am to 3:00 pm, current and perspective residents enjoyed the opportunity to share the amazing talent of our Panorama family. Most clutched a 12-page, easy-to-follow brochure providing maps, schedules, details, and locations throughout the campus.

Displays of 80 artists included painting, drawing, fabric art, basketry, woodworking, metalwork, quilting, weaving, clay arts, photography, jewelry and much more. Many sold their work.

Attendees could hear musicians at several locations on the campus on many different instruments after signing up for the optional on-the-hour campus shuttle from their home to all of the desired sites.

Back in our area where we were all day, chairs were set up for an afternoon group, South Sound Recorder Ensemble of nine residents. Also, the long performance of piano duets and violin works, which slowed down sales at our tables, was incredibly beautiful. At noon, two residents appeared with a mobile table. “Here are your bags of lunch!” My tummy growled a loud thank you for the pre-ordered, free for participants and volunteers,box lunch option.

“Whoa, Chris, look!!” I picked up one item at a time. “This huge tortilla wrap has turkey, lettuce, tomato, cheese and dressing. A bottle of cold water and a big bag of jalapeno chips. My favorites!” Chris removed the lid from a container of melons, pineapple and grapes. “This makes a great dessert.” By that time, our Seventeen51 Restaurant and Bistro was already serving a buffet lunch at a reasonable price.

Jim Shanower, along with a couple of advanced students, demonstrated basketry made of long pine needles! For several years, I’ve wanted to learn it, but was too busy writing my books. When Jim said two openings were left for the next class, I was determined to be at the Panorama Activity Desk the next day. GREAT NEWS! I was the last of the eight student limit! The class would be four hours each on two days. I’ll let you know if I “passed” in a later blog!

The day went by fast. I was pleased with my book sales. The staff and volunteers cleared out the display tables, chairs, stand-up directional signs, etc. and ended the day with Happy Hour in Seventeen51 Restaurant and Bistro from 3:30 pm to 5:00 pm.

Thank you Panorama staff, employees, resident volunteers, and all others involved for your generous help with supporting us residents who were able to share our music, performances, and writing skills. Blessed over and over once again.

Yoga & Summer Solstice

Written by Panorama resident, Charles Kasler. September 2019

Who are those crazy people still in the Pea Patch at 9:30 pm? We weren’t gardening; we’re yoga students celebrating the summer solstice on the longest day of the year. We enjoyed pleasant company in the beautiful gardens at twilight. We also did a little chair yoga and silent meditation. A good time was had by all!

We also had a summer workshop on self care with yoga. Our next event will be high tea on the Fall Equinox & then the Fall Meditation Retreat in October.

Yoga works on many levels. Foremost it is a spiritual practice, whatever your religious beliefs, because it quiets the agitation of the mind. We experience moments of inner peace and contentment through practice. Yoga trains the mind in concentration, which is a precursor to meditation – those transcendent moments of quiet mind and open heart. Compassion is an essential part of yoga as we realize the world is all one family.

And movement is what most people associate with yoga – twisting into pretzels. Of course, our practice is designed for seniors in a way that is accessible to all. In a recent survey the question was – how do you know your class is effective? I responded – because I see people moving like someone 20 years younger. It’s true!

Breath training is also an essential part of yoga. We all have dysfunctional breathing. Yoga helps release chronic constriction around the breath. Breath is the bridge between mind and body. It has a direct impact on emotions as well. Conscious breathing can quiet the mind as well as calm the emotions.

Students sometimes say I didn’t feel like coming this morning but I’m glad I did. I’ve heard that often over the years. Yoga becomes more effective and enjoyable the longer we practice. And, of course, we continually modify and adapt out practice to accommodate any limitations.

Come take a trial class and join the fun. You’ll be glad you did.

Wildlife

Written by Panorama resident, Sandy Bush. September 2019

It has been a fast-moving month here at Panorama. We are heading lickety-split into September. Some trees seem to be turning color early, especially in some of our hiking trips away from home.

The month has been full of animal happenings. We witnessed an eagle taking a bunny out on Golf Club Road on our eastern boundary. Meanwhile, I have been attending the summer lecture series at Nisqually Refuge every Wednesday evening and one night we had an overview of wolves in Washington.

What prompted this writing about wildlife was the fact that as I was driving friends home from our outing to Nisqually, a large coyote walked down the street I was turning onto. It was also where I had to walk after parking our vehicle. I took my hiking pole with the protective rubber cup off the bottom and headed for home. I figured that if it was lurking and watching me, I’d be ready to at least pound it across the snout, if not just jab it. I know, me the animal lover…..well….It was helpful to learn from the wolf evening lecture that wolves are really best suited to a woodsy habitat away from humans. Coyotes have become adapted to living within city limits and do very well in the urban interface. First People have always looked at coyotes as tricksters and very wily. Suffice it to say, I got home without another sighting.

What amazed me was the good condition of this animal. The one I had seen a month earlier in a friend’s backyard a few blocks away was leaner, smaller and obviously in the middle of a molt, looking very scraggly. The one in our neighborhood looked wonderfully fit.

Now someone on foot as tall as I am would never be approached, I assume. But a friend with a small dog on a leash (and we have so many wonderful little dogs as family members here in Panorama) has been followed by one or two coyotes on occasion. The “dog people” have been alerted about carrying rattling cans to scare a coyote off with the noise. I refer to these people affectionately as I consider myself a “cat person.”

This may alarm some folks, but I think it is a privilege to be able to live among the wild things. A doe and some fawns have been seen in our backyard and perhaps just moving away from a predator. The Chehalis Trail is our western boundary here at Panorama, and there is a fair amount of wildlife traffic over by Chambers Lake at our southern boundary.

It is one thing to enjoy wildlife on the outings and hiking trips offered to us, but it is totally another to experience some wildness right here in our neighborhoods. The seasons are changing and the coyotes and deer are finding it time to disperse to other regions. I am hoping we can give them the space they need to flourish, but not on our little family members!!!  Be alert and enjoy!